Zinc
Potassium

Sources Of Zinc

Seafood - oysters, herring
Meats - beef, lamb, beef and pork liver
Nuts/seeds - sunflower, pumpkin
Dairy - cheese
Grains - wheat germ
Miscellaneous - brewer's yeast, maple syrup, bone meal, gluten, tea

Roles In The Body

  • Activator of many key enzymes.
  • Growth and development
  • Male reproductive system
  • Insulin production and secretion
  • Prevention of cadmium and copper toxicity

Functions Of Zinc

Circulatory - maintenance of artery walls
Respiratory - removal of carbon dioxide and maintenance of acid-base balance
Digestive - production of digestive enzymes, and normal liver function
Nervous - essential for brain development and neurotransmitters
Special senses - appetite regulation, smell and taste
Reproductive - testes, ovaries, prostate, male fertility
Endocrine - insulin and pituitary gonadotropin secretion
Blood - red blood cells and blood proteins
Skeletal - bone integrity, prevention of osteoporosis
Skin - required for normal integrity of hair, nails, and skin
Protective - required for wound healing and integrity of the immune system
Metabolic - normal carbohydrate and protein metabolism
Detoxification - assists in removing toxic accumulation of cadmium and copper
Psychological - powerful mood stabilizer and 'sedative' mineral

Symptoms Associated With A Zinc Deficiency

alcoholic cirrhosis fatigue
arteriosclerosis hypoglycemia
cadmium toxicity hypothyroidism
carbohydrate intolerance impotence
copper toxicity lack of taste and smell
conditions due to birth defects low appetite
diabetes nervousness
emotional problems poor wound healing
failure to thrive prostate problems

Symptoms Associated With A Zinc Excess

anemia, iron deficiency nausea
depression vomiting
diarrhea  

Synergetic Nutrients

magnesium, vitamin A, D, E, B6, high-protein diet


Antagonistic Nutrients

Absorption - copper, cadmium, iron, chromium, manganese, selenium, phytic acid, vegetarian diets, soy, cereals, fiber in diet
Metabolic - copper, iron, cadmium

Hair Analysis Notes

Zinc is considered a "masculine" mineral, because of its importance in the formation of male sexual hormones.


High Hair Zinc:
  • An elevated zinc level is commonly due to a loss of zinc from the body tissues. In these cases, zinc supplements will often be recommended.
  • Zinc levels may appear high to help compensate for copper toxicity. Thus high zinc can be a tipoff of a hidden copper toxicity.
  • Use of Head and Shoulders shampoo occasionally results in an elevated zinc reading.
  • Cadmium toxicity can cause a zinc reading to appear high.

Low Hair Zinc:
  • Zinc will often read low if the sodium/potassium ratio is less than 2.5:1. In this case, it is not always wise to give much zinc.
  • Zinc is commonly low in "fast" oxidizers.
  • Very low zinc levels are often associated with emotional instability and with problems of growth and development in children.
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This material is for educational purposes only
The preceding statements have not been evaluated by the
Food and Drug Administration
This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Copyright © 2012 - The Eck Institute of Applied Nutrition and Bioenergetics, Ltd.